Current scenario in Engineering education

Engineering prepare the world to meet theever changing challenges in technology. This program enables future leaders to show the path of better world. It is like training processes which have specific course and pedagogy. Keeping the significance of engineering in view many Engineering colleges were established all over India. There are n numbers of Engineering Colleges in Odisha providing all courses related to engineering. In our society the knowledge and skills of engineering are in high demand in every sector. The engineering college in community ensures that we are having enough numbers of skilled people to fulfill our future demand.

Innovation and development is the sole of this course. Converting enthusiasticyoung mass to professional engineers is the regular work of these education houses. The vast range of exciting career of Engineering attracts many scholars from cities and country sides,currently this field exploring like anything and it gives hues career growth which catches eyes of every individual. Due to heavy opportunity in MNCs it inspires students in ample amount. There is ever growing space to build latest technology. Engineering not confined to a particular field but it is expanding and exploringday by day.

There is big role of schools and colleges to build the foundation of future leaders. The leading companies have high demand of engineers with advance skills in their organization. Considering that need of companiescolleges preparing their students as companyready from every angle. Workshops, labs, practical classes, industrial visit,etc. are now part of study in many colleges. Our Government has been taken many activities in hand to enhance that interest and gill power of students to explore in this field.

The outcome of this planning now in front of us that plenty of students is now interested to serve the society as engineers. That’s the reason there are large number of engineering colleges in every state. The Engineering Colleges in Odisha will change the face of this state with the help of talented students in it.

Bhubaneswar being the capital of Odisha all facilities like transport, construction Education, etc. is easily available comparative to other cities of this state. Many colleges constructed in Bhubaneswar due to availability of better infrastructures. These colleges attract students from remote areas and tribes to make their carrier better. More than 70 Engineering Colleges in Bhubaneswar are equipped with modern technology to introduce students with updated world of engineering. The students of these colleges will explore new definition of Engineering and technology.

Conceptual Framework

Conceptual Framework
According to Creswell (2014), the conceptual framework does create a logical chain of evidence through which the researcher does test and verify conclusions. The conceptual framework is usually developed so as to generate a comprehensive understanding of the applicability of employee involvement in project management. Involvement in decision-making is the independent variable while the goal achievement is the dependent variable.

Goal Setting Theory
The identified conceptual framework for this study is based on Goal Setting Theory. The goal setting theory normally assumes that a direct relationship does exist between the definition of the measurable and specific goals and the performance. The researcher, Edwin Locke primarily developed the theory when he started the goal setting research in 1960s (Locke & Latham 1979). Goal setting theory does involve the process of establishing levels of performance so as to obtain the desired outcomes. Based on the theory, it purport that the source of motivation involves the desire and the intention to reach a particular goal. According to Armstrong (2013), when managers know what they aim at achieving, they are motivated to put more effort that increases performance. The goal setting theory was advanced by Armstrong (2013), who emphasize on goal setting and encouragement of decision rights as the basis for employee performance. When the management allows the employees to get involved in decision-making on matters concerning them and the organization, it tends to increase the employee’s commitment. Employee involvement in decision-making wins the commitment of employees and when the management can win the employee’s commitment; it does increase job satisfaction and motivate employees to work hard.

Taking responsibility for the results requires that the members of the organization receive a chance to influence their results favorably and have freedom of taking action. Based on the theory, the decision rights tend to allow greater involvement of employees in deciding issues that do affect their work Armstrong (2013), He argues that employees are likely to meet their performance goals when they are empowered with authority to make decisions and also solve problems that relate to the results that they are accountable. The goals of an organization represent a shared responsibility among all its employees each of whom has a role in the success of the organization. The contribution of the employees tends to be a starting point for enumerating the results of which they are accountable. Thus, the goal setting theory is used in developing the study’s conceptual framework.

The employee can contribute significantly towards achieving the objectives and the goals of the organization. Hence, it is essential that the organization should have knowledge of the various factors that affect the behavior of their staff so as to bring out the best in these employees. Because of this, the researcher selects the goal setting theory as the conceptual framework for the study. The goal setting theory tends to be one of the most practical and influential theories of motivation. Several studies have been conducted to support the theory, and there tends to be a strong support that is setting goals related to performance improvement. The aim of the study is to examine how employee involvement in decision-making predicts goal achievement. Locke suggests that goals normally tell an employee what they need to do and how much effort should be expended (Latham, 2004). The theory does suggest that specific goals tend to increase performance and that the difficult goals when they are accepted do lead to higher performance.

From the theory, it suggests the significance of setting difficult goals as it leads to the increase in the likelihood of goal achievement. Locke postulated that through employee involvement and participation in goal setting, the employees are likely to participating in the goals and increasing performance; thus, enhancing the job satisfaction (Latham & Locke 2006). Goal setting tends to be an effective strategy of affecting performance through employee involvement, participation, and providing feedback. The involvement of the employee in setting goal tends to direct the behavior of the employee, and it contributes to higher performance than the absence of feedback and the lack of involvement. Latham, (2004) claims that difficult goals normally lead to participation through involvement employees in decision making and setting goals, enhanced employee-employer relations and also improved performance through producing high levels of planning and effort. Hence, goal setting may be an effective strategy for influence performance through enhances the initiatives of employee involvement by providing regular feedback and appropriate communication (Locke et al. 2010).

According to Latham & Locke (2006), the employee involvement in decision-making does include the process that results in some degree of transfer of then decision control and the responsibility from the superior to his subordinates. The participation in the setting of the work goals tends to fall in this definition as employee’s determination of goals is the transfer of the decision control and the responsibilities from the superior to the subordinates. Locke et al. (2010) conclude that participation in goal setting leads to increased performance. Erez et al. (1985) conducted a study to investigate the impact that participation in goal setting has on goal acceptance and the performance of the American college students. The researchers hypothesized that the level of the goal acceptance would increase as participation increased and participation influence performance through influence on acceptance. The study by Erez et al. (1985) revealed that the participative and representative goal setting increased the individual goal acceptance and the goal acceptance contributed to the performance. Locke et al. (2010) state that the involvement of employees in decision-making may contribute to the development of an effective strategy for attaining the goals that in turn increase the self-efficacy of the participant that the goal is attainable.

An examination of the goal setting theory, purport that the participation of the employee in setting the goal makes the goals to be more acceptable and it also leads to more involvement. With regards to involvement in setting the goals, the employees need to ensure that they have the necessary skills, abilities, and knowledge for reaching the goals. When the employees do not have the necessary skills, setting the outcome goals, have indicated to result in a lower level of performance (Seijts & Latham, 2005). Seijts & Latham (2005) state that people are more likely to feel helpless when they do not have the ability to reach the goals and making it difficult to achieve the goals.

Cloud Based Education

Is a “Cloud based” educational system a real possibility, or the mere dream of a utopian future? In hid TED talk, educator and activist, Suguta Mitra asserts his optimistic vision of access to learning for all. His enthusiasm for a global cloud based education is not without experiential foundation. Mitra relates how his experiments of placing computer terminals in remote locations with the particular intention of engaging children with the machines, lead to some astonishing discoveries and insights about the nature of learning.

Mitra started by placing a computer terminal in a slum neighborhood in Delhi. He wanted to see how the local children, most living in poverty with no exposure to technology, would respond to an essentially alien device. The children he found in the city were fast adaptors, mastering the computer in a few months. Some attributed this to the urban atmosphere in Delhi were the kids were probably instructed by a local technologist. Mitra was not convinced. Determined to prove his findings, he next placed a computer 100 miles outside Delhi in the remote village where most of the population did not even speak English. Again he did not instruct the children, shrugging off questions with responses like “well, it is.” Months passed and when he came back he found the children playing games. They were irritated with him “you left this machine here with instructions in English so we had to learn English,’ they said. They also requested a faster processor and a better mouse.

In the final level of this experiment, Mitra decided to leave a computer loaded with esoteric explanations of DNA all in a non-English speaking Tamil town. “It has lots of important information on it,” he told the curious local children. He had no expectation they would be able to decipher any of the scientific content. Months later he again returned and it seemed his anticipated result of no progress was indeed the case. “We study it every day,” the children said, “We know nothing.” Mitra was ready to accept this failure and then, a small girl piped up in broken English “Yes, except for the fact a broken DNA strand leads to disease, we have learned nothing.”

In continuing cases Mitra found the same results. He also discovered the children learned more with some interaction with an adult. These adults, however, did not take on a formal teaching role, but instead acted in what he describes as the “granny approach;” standing behind the children and asking questions like ‘OH, what is that?” “What do you think it means?” He even employed a whole retinue of English grandmothers to interact with village children via the internet.

The implications Mitra’s experiments have for the use of the Cloud as a provider of knowledge, and the educational process itself are remarkable. In the past citizens were educated in many basic clerical skills, reading, writing etc., which in many ways have been replaced by machines. The population of the future will be more focused in understanding and interpreting information, rather than more rudimentary tasks. With the simple access to information an abundance of true thinkers can be developed.